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Paragraph 1(iv) states: “That the fundamental issues and causes of conflict that have marked relations between the two countries over the past 25 years must be resolved by peaceful means, and refers to the Kashmir dispute, which arose twenty-five years earlier in 1947. The promise that “no party shall unilaterally change the situation” invalidates, under international law, the attempt to dismember J&K`s special status in violation of this bilateral agreement and UN Security Council resolutions. The agreement did not mention prisoners of war; However, after the second agreement signed two years later in Delhi, India released more than 93,000 prisoners of war, including 195 accused of war crimes. Simla`s Pakistani spokesman said he was pleased with the outcome and said: “We remain where we are until a final settlement is reached,” reaffirming that Pakistan`s position had been maintained and that the region remained a controversial region. However, some Pakistanis suspected a “secret deal” when Indira Gandhi changed her position just before the deal was signed, claiming that the Bhoutto had entered into a “sales contract” to end Pakistan`s right to Kashmir. They also claimed that Bhutto had obtained a “non-distortion pact”. This Agreement shall be subject to ratification by both countries in accordance with their respective constitutional procedures and shall enter into force from the date of exchange of instruments of ratification. [4] I will explain later why I highlighted parts of the Simla Agreement. I must first recall Mr. Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who later became Prime Minister of India, who “claimed that [Z.A.] Bhutto had achieved all three objectives at Simla, “== Bhargava, Success or Surrender, New Delhi, Sterling, 1972, p.

68) The Delhi Agreement on the Identification of War and Internal Civilians is a tripartite agreement between the aforementioned States, signed on 28 August 1973. The agreement was signed by Kamal Hossain, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Government of Bangladesh, Sardar Swaran Singh, Minister of Foreign Affairs of India, and Aziz Ahmed, Minister of State for Defence and Foreign Affairs of the Government of Pakistan. [9] [10] [11] On April 14, 1995, P. N. Dhar, then Secretary to the Indian Prime Minister, that there was a secret clause on the Simla Agreement. . . .